SURETY COMPANY DATA:

Accredited Surety and Casualty Company

Political Contributions

According to the California Secretary of State, from 2003 to 2018, Accredited Surety and Casualty Company has spent a total of $209,859.10 on campaigns in California.

Lobbying

Accredited was ranked second on the list of top lobbying spenders only behind the American Bail Coalition. According to the National Institute on Money in Politics, Accredited Surety and Casualty spent a total of $1,121,804 on state lobbying from 2007 to 2018.

Ownership

Accredited was ranked second on the list of top lobbying spenders only behind the American Bail Coalition. According to the National Institute on Money in Politics, Accredited Surety and Casualty spent a total of $1,121,804 on state lobbying from 2011 to 2018.

Leadership

Director

Title

Affiliated Companies

Kenneth Randall

Chairman

RQIH

Todd Campbell

President/CEO/Director

Marney Emel

CFO/Treasurer/Director

Sharon Jallad

COO/Secretary/Director

Michael Glover

Assistant Secretary

RQIH (former)

Dirty Laundry

Killing Reforms

In 2009, Accredited Surety and Casualty Company was one of the key companies behind a legal appeal in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth District asking the court to kill a pre-trial release program in Orange County. As the Orlando Sentinel pointed out, “the real problem is the program costs the bail-bond industry money. During the past three years, about 200 fewer inmates a month have bought bail bonds -- and about 300 more are getting out under the county [pre-trial release] program."

Furthermore, the Orlando Sentinel concludes that “as the program cut deeper into profits, the bail-bond industry has unleashed a high-octane public-relations campaign to rein in such programs, not only in Orange but also elsewhere. As the industry's lawyers spell out in its legal appeal: 'The more bonds it issues, the more income it receives.'"


Releasing the Wrong Person

In 2018, a bail bondsman from Accredited Surety mistakenly released the wrong defendant with the same name. According to the New York Daily News, the mistaken release involved a defendant with a long rap sheet “Darren Stokes, 57, who is three times older than the high school senior the bond was intended for was wrongly released...." Meanwhile, the younger Darren Stokes, 18, of Brooklyn, was stuck sitting behind bars for nearly three weeks after his mother paid the company nearly $2,000 in fees to free him.”